Things I’m Verbing: TV hates women, women hate the monoculture and the monoculture hates jobs

This has been a particularly crummy week for great women. Obviously I’m annoyed as all get-out that ABC canceled Agent Carter (even as Captain America: Civil War nears $300 million in domestic gross alone). It is certainly worth considering the show’s flaws even aside from ratings — this Medium post articulates a lot of what it was upContinue reading “Things I’m Verbing: TV hates women, women hate the monoculture and the monoculture hates jobs”

Things I’m Verbing: The Invisible Hand of Westeros, Evading Spoiler Minefields and the Voice of Turtle Power

For the next week, I have this problem: I want to be on the Internet, and particularly social media, but I also want to go into seeing Captain America: Civil War next Friday without having seen most of it in either leaked clips or people talking openly about spoilers. Concurrently, I’m also eager for any newsContinue reading “Things I’m Verbing: The Invisible Hand of Westeros, Evading Spoiler Minefields and the Voice of Turtle Power”

Things I’m Verbing: So many hedgehogs, not enough Agent Carter and, of course, Midwest Is Best

Good morning, friends! I am back in Chicago for the first time since I moved to New York, and I have been doing a really excellent job of revisiting all my favorite haunts, including pulling a double-header with the superlative Improvised Shakespeare Company last night. (That’s a Top 5 Thing I Miss About Chicago item, byContinue reading “Things I’m Verbing: So many hedgehogs, not enough Agent Carter and, of course, Midwest Is Best”

Things I’m Verbing: Grief, gardens and the privilege of access

I posted my first story for Hello Giggles today, and it’s one that’s close to my heart in a lot of ways. Agent Carter is a TV show about a woman kicking ass in the 1940s, but it’s also, in its first season, a show about confronting grief. “What Agent Carter Gets Right About Grief” is aContinue reading “Things I’m Verbing: Grief, gardens and the privilege of access”