Things I’m Verbing: Innovations in linguistics, the history of fear and TSA-proofing your phone

Yet again, where do we even start? Before we dive in, let me share a good hour of nature sounds you can play in the background as you absorb the news. This one’s only an hour, as opposed to 10, but it’s lovely:

My very favorite is the crackling fireplace, but I’m always on the lookout for a good forest sounds ambient mix. Let me know in the comments if you have any recs.

  • Sure has been a week for talking about antisemitism, hasn’t it? Trump, for instance, shouted down an Orthodox Jewish reporter for asking an “unfair question” about how Trump planned to push back on rising antisemitism. Tablet’s Yair Rosenberg wrote up the handy “Five myths about antisemitism” for the Washington Post. For those still confused and angry about it, Chaim at Return of the Judai discusses the fine (or really, not-so-fine) line between antisemitism and anti-Zionism.
  • Earlier this week, I shared an essay from a psychiatrist who felt comfortable armchair-diagnosing Trump with a mental disorder, even though both journalism and psychology/psychiatry strongly discourage this as unethical. I shared the essay because the writer goes into the discourse surrounding the topic, even though I couldn’t agree with her conclusion. As it turns out, however, the doctor who codified Narcissistic Personality Disorder has a few strong words about why Trump doesn’t fit the profile.
  • Quincy Larson, a teacher at FreeCodeCamp, shared advice about maintaining your digital privacy on international flights — namely, don’t give security the option of the simplest workaround: physically forcing you to access your data.
  • This is a big, ambitious link, but worthwhile. From the New Republic, check out “Fear: The History of a Political Idea,” a series of five essays about short-circuiting all your best intentions.
  • Bless the Scots. Not only has #PresidentBawbag become a worldwide phenomenon in part thanks to Richard “Toby Ziegler” Schiff, but Scotland may also have given us the latest addictive epithet to get us through the chaos: “shitgibbon.” Turns out there’s a whole grammar behind constructing these kinds of insults, and it’s all pretty brilliant.

Stay brave, friends.

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